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Steve

My name is Steve Milton, I'm kinda responsible for this stuff
Steve has written 13 posts for The Idyllists

Collaborators wanted!

Do you have a feeling for these painters?  Would you be willing to help an old duffer get a wealth of information online, where it will be of use to scholars in the future?  These truly inspirational artists deserve higher acclaim but my writing is poor and my time is limited, so I’m looking for … Continue reading

Selina Weetch

  On 19th February, 1884 North was married to the 21-year- old Selina Weetch at Bicknoller Church in Somerset. Selina was the daughter of Abraham Weetch a local farmer. The couple moved into Beggearn Huish House in Nettlecombe rented (according to Berta Lawrence) from the Wyndham family. In this comfortable sandstone house with its stables … Continue reading

J W North: The Publishers’ Circular and Booksellers’ Record on 10/1/1925

The following is a transcript of an article by Gilbert Dalziel that appeared in the The Publishers’ Circular and Booksellers’ Record on 10/1/1925. “As a painter in watercolours, North’s sense of colour was simply superb. He saw in Nature hues and effects which to an ordinary pair of eyes would be unobservable; and that he … Continue reading

J W North Correspondence with Churchill Osbourne

 A fragment of surviving correspondence between the artist J W North ARA and C Churchill Osbourne of 6 De Vaux Place Salisbury. Osborne was briefly editor of the Salisbury Journal. The correspondence concerns the Wiltshire writer Richard Jefferies, arrangements for the financial relief of his widow and children and the adminstration of various funds raised … Continue reading

The Winter Sun – J W North ARA RWS (1891)

‘The Winter Sun’ oil on canvas (667mm x 984mm) purchased by the Chantrey Bequest from the New Gallery for £315, proposed by Lord Leighton. This painting is now in the Tate Gallery. Completed in 1891 when North was 49 and living at Beggearn Huish House in West Somerset. Exhibited at the New Gallery Summer Exhibition … Continue reading

A Goddess – J W North ARA RWS (1913)

C ompleted in 1913 when North was 71 and displayed at the RWS Winter Exhibition (No.55). A really unusual subject for North. He was much criticised for his figure drawing (in early works it seems that Pinwell and Walker painted in figures for North – so he must have been sensitive to the accusations) and … Continue reading

The use of Chinese White

Just the other day, I was asked about the use of Chinese White in North’s watercolours. The best source of information about North’s watercolour technique comes from Herkomer’s Slade lecture that I have posted on the site. But from memory… Many of the English watercolour artists of the middle to late C19 used to mix … Continue reading

J W North ARA RWS at Nettlecombe, West Somerset

Paul Mansfield sent this snippet from the West Somerset Free Press, 15 Feb 1930: Several artists have been associated with Nettlecombe and the surrounding district. Of those, one of the most dstinguished was J W North, the painter and illustrator. He seems to be kindly remembered by those who knew him. Sir Walter Trevelyan, the … Continue reading

John William North and Richard Jefferies

Based on a talk given to the Richard Jefferies Society in Swindon, Wiltshire :December 2003 Most readers of Richard Jefferies will know something of his friendship with the artist John William North from the references in Walter Besant’s ‘Eulogy’ published in 1888. John North was born in Fulham on New Year’s Day 1842, second son … Continue reading

Painter and Poet

J.W.NORTH, A.R.A., R.W.S., PAINTER AND POET. BY PROFESSOR HUBERT HERKOMER, R.A., M.A. A Lecture delivered in Oxford, 1892 ONE of the most truly original painters of our times is Mr. J. W. North. Of this originality he himself is not aware, and was once greatly astonished to read in a criticism on his work that … Continue reading

The Idyllic World of John William North ARA RWS

By R M Billingham The Somerset countryside has always been a landscape artist’s paradise but it was unknown to many of the greatest painters of the nineteenth century, and was never immortalised by a major artist such as Constable whose inspiration was the Suffolk countryside. But in 1860 one young illustrator penetrated the rural depths … Continue reading

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Steve Milton: Curator in Chief